WE’RE UKRAINE

This video was shot in the beautiful swimming poolY-40, the deepest swimming pool in the world, which is located near between Padua and Venice. Ukrainian director Matt Evans wanted to celebrate his homeland with an intense and moving video to the tune of "1944", a song by Ukrainian Jamala who won the Eurovision Song Contest in Stockholm in 2016.
( video with english subtitles)

SOPHIA NARRETT

Painting with skeins of thread, embroidering erotic designs, weaving desires. Sophia Narrett manages to bring erotic scenes to life by creating a new form of frayed tapestry. Sophia is a young artist whose work is inspired by pop culture references: "Orange Is the New Black". Hip-hop artist Kendrick Lamar. Scottish fashion designer Christopher Kane. "The bachelor." Her embroidered pieces are colorful, both literally and figuratively, manifestations of the world she lives.
Narrett's later pieces are reminiscent of 16th-century Dutch painter Hieronymus Bosch, known for his detailed landscapes and wild images, of a more fantastic and sexual nature. Like Bosch, Narrett involves the viewer in images so complex, so detailed that looking at them and following the narration, especially the sequential ones, seems almost voyeuristic.

SCHIELE COULD BE FAMOUS WITHOUT KLIMT?

Can a talent come out and face the world alone or is the presence of someone necessary to act as an intermediary? Schiele was a boy pathologically linked to his sister Gerti, whom he had portrayed naked in various portraits. He is not happy in school because the masters are considered by him to be all rough men. Encouraged by Strauch, the Klosternburg painter Max Kahrer and the Augustinian canon Wolfang Paker, in 1906 Schiele applied for admission to the Vienna Academy. So if it hadn't been for them, we might never have known his works.
Strauch refines the technique of the young Egon noting in the nervous ease of his sign an affinity with Klimt, which Schiele does not yet know. Schiele is not a model student and is only 16 when he pits against his teacher Griepenkernl. It is in the veneration for Klimt that youth rebellion against the teacher and against academic dogmatism must be interpreted. These are the years in which Gustav Klimt is at the height of his career. But while Klimt colors his pictorial works with strange mosaics, for Schiele the painting represents the conflict between life and death. From this moment on his figures begin the phase of deformation. At this stage his design becomes harsh and suffering. The formal tension is entrusted to broken, broken and angular lines. Klimt's dream is shattered for Schiele. In Schiele we find suffering. The characters portrayed by him are no longer human beings but rigid mannequins forced into disjointed and unnatural poses. The bodies thus transformed are the artist's conscious attempt to use limbs, arms, hands and bodies to highlight inner emotions.
The decisive meeting for his entire artistic career took place in 1907 in the Café Museum in Vienna. Klimt's strong personality influences him tremendously. A further element brings the two men closer: the interest in depicting the naked body and both male and female sexuality. Gustav Klimt will also have great esteem for Schiele: he undertakes to help his friend, through the purchase of drawings, providing him with models, introducing him to some wealthy patrons, who assured him a certain financial peace of mind right from his beginnings on the Viennese art scene and ensuring that in 1908 Schiele could hold his first solo exhibition for the Wiener Werkstätte.
After a period spent in prison on an accusation of immoral conduct, as the painter used naked children as models for his works, disappointed by this bad experience, Schiele decides to return to Vienna. Thanks to his friend Klimt, he managed to obtain several commissions in a short time, returning to the fore on the Austrian art scene and participating in many international exhibitions. His works of the period are numerous, mostly self-portraits and portraits. The figures are usually naked, in unusual poses that tend to lead to caricature; the tormented figure recalls both death and eroticism.
So in the end I ask myself: if Egon Schiele hadn't had the help of all these people, and especially Klimt, would he have been able to show everyone his talent?

THE MASTER OF CHIAROSCURO: CARAVAGGIO

CARAVAGGIO- MADONNA DEI PELLEGRINI
CARAVAGGIO- LA CROCIFISSIONE DI SAN PAOLO
CARAVAGGIO- CENA DI EMMAUS
CARAVAGGIO- I GIOCATORI
CARAVAGGIO- LA DEPOSIZIONE DI GESÚ
CARAVAGGIO- SETTE OPERE DI MISERICORDIA
CARAVAGGIO- GIUDITTA TAGLIA LA TESTA DI OLOFERNE
CARAVAGGIO-LA BUONA VENTURA
CARAVAGGIO-BACCO
CARAVAGGIO- TESTA DI MEDUSA
CARAVAGGIO- RAGAZZO MORSO DA RAMARRO
CARAVAGGIO- VOCAZIONE DI SAN MATTEO
CARAVAGGIO- CONVERSIONE DI SAN PAOLO
CARAVAGGIO-DECOLLAZIONEDI SAN GIOVANNI BATTISTA
CARAVAGGIO- DAVIDE CON LA TESTA DI GOLIA
CARAVAGGIO-SAN GIOVANNI BATTISTA
CARAVAGGIO-SAN GIROLAMO SCRIVENTE
CARAVAGGIO-SALOMÈ CON LA TESTA DEL BATTISTA
CARAVAGGIO-FANCIULLO CON CANESTRA DI FRUTTA
CARAVAGGIO-CANESTRA DI FRUTTA
CARAVAGGIO- SAN GIROLAMO IN MEDITAZIONE

THE EFFEC OF ART IN THE BRAIN

There are artists who paint what they see, others who paint what they remember or what they imagine. Our brain changes in the face of reality but, at the same time, it is capable of changing it: a "different" brain must therefore have a different relationship with reality.
In art this "process" can lead to the creation of new realities, which will only partly depend on "sensorial information"; our brain, in fact, does not necessarily need the continuous "information flow" coming from our senses. Dreams, memories that "revive" in mental images and also representations "simply" created by our mind testify to this event.
In this sense, art amplifies reality, creates a new "mental channel" capable of opening up to new experiences. The visual stimuli, real or evoked by memory, which excite the nervous system of the artist at the moment of the creation of the work of art, transformed by his hand into colors and shapes, will stimulate the nervous system of the observer. The work of art must be able to arouse in the observer's brain sensations and emotions that were present in the artist's brain. Approaching a work of art, looking at it, perceiving it, understanding it and appreciating it, implies the involvement of many brain structures and the activation of very specific mechanisms, starting from the functioning at the basis of visual perception, to those involved in the so-called "psychology of see ", in the aesthetic and emotional experience. This refers not only to the emotion felt by those who enjoy a painting but also to the creative moment that involves the artist to create his work.
Some researchers, especially psychologists and neurophysiologists, have been fascinated by the possibility of studying the properties and characteristics of the brain that are part of the evaluation of a work of art and the pleasure it can give; persuaded by the idea that the understanding of these cerebral mechanisms, together with the knowledge of the events of the life of an artist and of the culture of his time, can favor a greater "knowledge" and appreciation of the work and of those who created it.
A work of art is born from the combination of what the artist experiences "visually" and how he interprets what is communicated to him from the outside world. Both the acquisition of visual information and its internal processing can be altered by pathological causes.
The effects of serious mental illnesses, often altering the artist's perceptive and emotional abilities, can affect his pictorial expression and testify how the painter's life story becomes an integral part of his work.
All this emerges in the paintings of some great painters in particular moments of their life.

SOME ARTISTS WERE MAD?

There are artists who paint what they see, others who paint what they remember or what they imagine. Our brain changes in the face of reality but, at the same time, it is capable of changing it: a "different" brain must therefore have a different relationship with reality.
In art this "process" can lead to the creation of new realities, which will only partly depend on "sensorial information"; our brain, in fact, does not necessarily need the continuous "information flow" coming from our senses. Dreams, memories that "revive" in mental images and also representations "simply" created by our mind testify to this event.
In this sense, art amplifies reality, creates a new "mental channel" capable of opening up to new experiences. The visual stimuli, real or evoked by memory, which excite the nervous system of the artist at the moment of the creation of the work of art, transformed by his hand into colors and shapes, will stimulate the nervous system of the observer. The work of art must be able to arouse in the observer's brain sensations and emotions that have been present in the artist's brain [Maffei L., Fiorentini A., 1995]. Approaching a work of art, looking at it, perceiving it, understanding it and appreciating it, implies the involvement of many brain structures and the activation of very specific mechanisms, starting from the functioning at the basis of visual perception, to those involved in the so-called "psychology of see ", in the aesthetic and emotional experience. This refers not only to the emotion felt by those who enjoy a painting but also to the creative moment that involves the artist to create his work.
Some researchers, especially psychologists and neurophysiologists, have been fascinated by the possibility of studying the properties and characteristics of the brain that are part of the evaluation of a work of art and the pleasure it can give; persuaded by the idea that the understanding of these cerebral mechanisms, together with the knowledge of the events of the life of an artist and of the culture of his time, can favor a greater "knowledge" and appreciation of the work and of those who created it.
A work of art is born from the combination of what the artist experiences "visually" and how he interprets what is communicated to him from the outside world. Both the acquisition of visual information and its internal processing can be altered by pathological causes.
The effects of serious mental illnesses, often altering the artist's perceptive and emotional abilities, can affect his pictorial expression and testify how the painter's life story becomes an integral part of his work.
All this emerges in the paintings of some great painters in particular moments of their life.
Francisco Goya (1746-1828) was suffering from an encephalopathy, due to lead poisoning (an element then present in the Francisco Goya, Detail "Cronus devours his children" Madrid, Prado Museum of pigments of various colors), which caused him deafness and personality alteration. At first his illness hindered him in all activities and was the cause of a deep depression; nightmare figures populated his paintings when he began to paint again.
The depression that afflicted Michelangelo (1475-1564) was of psychic origin. In painting the face of St. Bartholomew while showing the knife to the Judge, the artist brought a painful self-portrait into the folds of the skin of martyrdom Michelangelo Buonarroti, Particular "Last Judgment" Rome, Sistine Chapel. The perceptual, emotional and expressive systems of other great painters have been, more dramatically, altered by severe mental illnesses, such as schizophrenia and manic-depressive syndrome.
Gruesser et al., (1988) described the abnormal perception of faces as a particular disorder characteristic of schizophrenic patients. The faces observed by these patients could quickly change their expression, assuming more and more the appearance of a monster: the mouth opened highlighting the protruding canines, the nose and eyes became larger, the pupils dilated. Some drawings or paintings reported by patients with schizophrenia highlight this particular characteristic and show, while communicating the suffering and perceptual distortions of this terrible disease, how "madness" can, in some cases, suggest a "brilliant" artistic creativity.
Deformations of the faces, anxious and frightened faces, obsessive expressions seem to reach the limits of pathology in the painter James Ensor (1860-1949). The artist's canvases begin to be populated with bizarre figures until they reach the apotheosis of James Ensor, "Christ's Entry into Brussels" Malibu, Getty Museums overcrowding in what is considered his masterpiece: Christ's Entry into Brussels .
The strange figures in the painting may seem the result of hallucinatory visions but, at the same time, they draw on a supernatural reality; the mask with the rice takes on an ambivalent value because its use allows, through transvestism, to modify what is hidden behind it.

Once again the boundaries of pathology, such as those between "reality" and "hallucination", become blurred and painfully distinguishable.

And then other mad artist like:

The depression of Monet, and De Chirico.
Modigliani's alcoholism,
Rousseau's masochism,
Schiele's pedophile tendencies.
The paranoid critical method of Dalì, exhibitionist and histrionic, who proudly claimed: "The only difference between me and a madman is that I am not mad".

ART IS UNUSEFUL NOW

I was an artist, in my past, I abandoned everything. I am Italian and Italy is the cradle of art but we modern artists have no value and are not considered. Art is dead, it is not even sold in thrift stores. Nobody wants art and books. It is a company that has lost its sense of beauty. I also created jewels, bags, all sewn only with needle and thread, all ecological to the maximum, but nobody wants objects and things not signed by famous people. I hate this destructive society, I hate living in this place where art is deemed useless. Art is completely useless. (!?) There is a paradox in this statement that crosses different aspects of living. From the point of view of economic logic, art has no value (… and be careful not to confuse the accidental usefulness of the work of art), and it is for this reason that the evaluation of the work of art is almost entrusted to discretion. of the operators of the sector, which in any case has no practical basis except in the research paths that distinguish it. This is the difficulty of the artist when he tries to quantify the value of his own art, confused between the value of his own creative force and the product of this work, finally also unwittingly resorting to recognizing the canons of the art system. For these reasons, the artist’s image is often distorted and associated with bizarre behavior and in any case of economic unreliability. The artist is often torn between the need to express all his expressive / artistic potential and that of obtaining a sufficient livelihood income anyway. The problem is that the two are complementary and it follows that chasing the first solution leads to distancing from the other. However, although art does not correspond to an economic value, it still has an exchange value and the person is often the bearer and component of it. Dressing in fashion is an example of enjoying art. Before stating that art is useless, the person will have to stop and explain why he wears colorful clothes instead of being satisfied with the simple usefulness of clothing. Art does not bring practical improvements. However, it influences the psychophysical state of the person and therefore indirectly becomes the bearer of well-being. This is partly associated with the value of art. The contradiction arises from the fact that art is the expression of the gratuitousness of feelings, while its commodification is a mask placed at a later time that can hide its origin.

AKINO KONDOCH

Akino Kondoh is a Japanese cartoonist who also has a prolific career as an animator, illustrator and painter. His illustrations are suggestive and to view, and in them some graphic themes already present in his comics return, such as "The world of insects".The magical realism of Kondoh's works is nourished by a lively and subtle eroticism, which is expressed in young female figures wrapped in surreal scenarios, where the backgrounds are often composed of repetition of patterns and acid or intense black colors.
Akino Kondoh was born in Chiba in 1980, she has been living in the United States for some years and her works have been exhibited in exhibitions all over the world, from Shanghai to Brussels and New York. In 2018 in Italy one of his manga was published by Coconino Press, entitled The world of insects, a story with a dreamlike atmosphere that seems to take inspiration as much from Alice in Wonderland as from Little Nemo.
Japan, on the other hand, is a land of contrasts: tenderness and obscenity, a dreamlike landscape and merciless reality intertwine, enchanting and expending the imagination of anyone who passes through it, even just between the pages of a book. The manga has always been nourished by these contrasts, and Akino's stories are an extraordinary glue: a bridge between the centenary tradition of the genre and the pop drives of the present.

MY FAVOURITE VINCENT

The Blossoming Almond Branch is an oil painting on canvas that Van Gogh painted in Saint-Rémy in 1880 shortly before taking his own life. He painted it on the occasion of the birth of his nephew Vincent Willem, son of his beloved brother Theo. Inside, he chose to represent, as a symbol of nascent life, a freshly blossomed almond tree. Almond blossoms are the first to bloom with the beginning of spring, sometimes even anticipating it by blooming in late winter, and therefore become the symbol of life and the hope it brings with it. Nevertheless, since they tend to fade after a short time they also represent fragility, delicacy. So much, in short, in a single painting, in a simple branch. All this to say that this is one of the Van Gogh paintings that I love most. There is nothing that strikes me more than beauty, pure charm, that what is fragile unconsciously possesses.

WHAT IS USELESS IN YOUR LIFE?

If we took one of these paintings to a gallery today, it would be considered amateur painting. Because other types of paintings are in fashion, often digital, that everyone wants in their living room. Modern art is now considered useless junk. When I go to exhibitions, here for example the Biennale, there are always very few people. Today, more than ever, people judge art as a superfluous thing, which one can do very well without. And I say this as an artist. Talking to so many people, how much they feel that I am an artist, everyone becomes "what a beautiful thing". But if you ask them how many artists' paintings they have bought in their entire life, they say "I'm sorry, nobody". If I ask why they tell me they had more needed things and they used their money for other things. This is really disheartening for an artist but in reality this happens.The painting I put here in this post is a PAUL KLEE's artwork. Would you who look at it think it's worth millions? Yet Christies of London sold a Klee for:

Hammer price: $ 6,767,549 (Christie's, London, United Kingdom, 21/06/2011)
Maybe you found a Klee work in your attic and you think it's the artistic task of some nerdy kid. Because for many people artists waste time, starve and produce useless things. Not all think this thought but most. Even if an artist is quoted a lot of money, he remains one who produced useless things.
"Art is completely useless"

What do you think about it?

This sentence was written by Oscar Wilde, more than a century ago in the preface of his famous short story "The Portrait of Dorian Gray".
In particular Wilde said:

"We can forgive a man for having done something useful if he does not admire it. The only excuse for doing something useless is to admire it intensely. All art is seless."

Beauty for millions of people is a beautiful woman, a beautiful man, an actress, a Greek statue. How much art do you have in your home? How much art would you like?
Why does an artist keep creating? If there is any artist among you and he wants to answer, he can give his idea here. If there is someone who paints as a hobby, you can tell here why they do it and what emotions they feel.

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