MY FAVOURITE VINCENT

The Blossoming Almond Branch is an oil painting on canvas that Van Gogh painted in Saint-Rémy in 1880 shortly before taking his own life. He painted it on the occasion of the birth of his nephew Vincent Willem, son of his beloved brother Theo. Inside, he chose to represent, as a symbol of nascent life, a freshly blossomed almond tree. Almond blossoms are the first to bloom with the beginning of spring, sometimes even anticipating it by blooming in late winter, and therefore become the symbol of life and the hope it brings with it. Nevertheless, since they tend to fade after a short time they also represent fragility, delicacy. So much, in short, in a single painting, in a simple branch. All this to say that this is one of the Van Gogh paintings that I love most. There is nothing that strikes me more than beauty, pure charm, that what is fragile unconsciously possesses.

WHAT IS USELESS IN YOUR LIFE?

If we took one of these paintings to a gallery today, it would be considered amateur painting. Because other types of paintings are in fashion, often digital, that everyone wants in their living room. Modern art is now considered useless junk. When I go to exhibitions, here for example the Biennale, there are always very few people. Today, more than ever, people judge art as a superfluous thing, which one can do very well without. And I say this as an artist. Talking to so many people, how much they feel that I am an artist, everyone becomes "what a beautiful thing". But if you ask them how many artists' paintings they have bought in their entire life, they say "I'm sorry, nobody". If I ask why they tell me they had more needed things and they used their money for other things. This is really disheartening for an artist but in reality this happens.The painting I put here in this post is a PAUL KLEE's artwork. Would you who look at it think it's worth millions? Yet Christies of London sold a Klee for:

Hammer price: $ 6,767,549 (Christie's, London, United Kingdom, 21/06/2011)
Maybe you found a Klee work in your attic and you think it's the artistic task of some nerdy kid. Because for many people artists waste time, starve and produce useless things. Not all think this thought but most. Even if an artist is quoted a lot of money, he remains one who produced useless things.
"Art is completely useless"

What do you think about it?

This sentence was written by Oscar Wilde, more than a century ago in the preface of his famous short story "The Portrait of Dorian Gray".
In particular Wilde said:

"We can forgive a man for having done something useful if he does not admire it. The only excuse for doing something useless is to admire it intensely. All art is seless."

Beauty for millions of people is a beautiful woman, a beautiful man, an actress, a Greek statue. How much art do you have in your home? How much art would you like?
Why does an artist keep creating? If there is any artist among you and he wants to answer, he can give his idea here. If there is someone who paints as a hobby, you can tell here why they do it and what emotions they feel.

CAMILLE CLAUDEL

CAMILLE CLAUDEL is a french female sculptress. She lives her life in an extraordinary and contradictory context in Belle Époque France where the realization of female identity was still very difficult. Despite the various obstacles, the sculptress managed to establish herself by carving out an unprecedented and not small space for action in art - there are over fifty works that document the entire span of her production - despite the existential junctions that strongly influenced her: the problematic relationship with the family, the strong bond with his brother Paul, who converted will become an exponent of the uncompromising Catholicism of the French society of the times, the love and hate story with the sculptor Rodin and finally the mental illness, the twist in itself - as in the statue of the cover image - and internment in an asylum.

The academy Camille attended was mainly dedicated to sculpture, offered women the same opportunities as men and left the pupils great flexibility in the curriculum. Shortly afterwards Camille decided to move to an atelier in Rue Notre-Dame-des-Champs, where in 1882 Auguste Rodin came to teach. At that time, the master had been fighting for a quarter of a century against the classicist sculpture of the time. After two years under the direction of Rodin, Camille perfectly modeled the human body especially her hands and feet, thus she became one of Rodin's assistants, preparing clay, plaster and armor or modeling the hands and feet of sculptural subjects. Their works in fact in that period are very similar, obviously Rodin used Camille's genius as it was normal at the time to use his assistants. It is also true that we have a large production of Rodin in this period, of Camille almost nothing.
Their well-known love affair, which was born working side by side, leads to fifteen years of a passionate and stormy affair, from which Camille will however emerge exhausted, defeated not only humanly but also as an artist to the point of destroying her own works. Camille ends her relationship with the sculptor after realizing that no marriage would be possible between them - Rodin will always remain attached to Rose Beuret, his constant companion for years that the sculptor will never leave. Most likely, from some sources there is also evidence of an interrupted pregnancy, it seems that this very event has seriously undermined the balance of the young woman. An unhappy love, that for Auguste Rodin, exclusive, tinged with professional jealousies and above all poisoned by the prejudices of society, by the distance and then by the abandonment of Camille by the Claudel family in solitude and in precarious economic conditions.
Camille has always shown that she has a unique talent and genius, she has absolute mastery of movement, think of one of her most famous works La Valse (1895-1905) where movement and stillness are in perfect balance. For the client, the figuration of an embrace was clear and the work even scandalized the inspector of the Ministry of Fine Arts.

Here it is a perfect whole of strength, screwed on itself, pushed by the dynamism of the male figure that wraps the female one tied and held by the dress that descends to the ground. For the artist it is an attempt to grasp life in its movement, in its transformation, in the precarious balance of a tormented bond. What matters is that over time, the artist will not want to depict a single figure, he is not satisfied with the character but wants to tell a story, a complete narrative. A talent, that of Camille, which already leads her to distinguish herself from her peers at the age of 12, took inspiration everywhere for her drawings and clay sculptures from old engravings to anatomical models using her brothers Paul and Louise as models.
Camille had a limp defect and this perhaps led her to seek perfection in art with an impulsive gesture. She was very attached to her father, who was in fact her greatest ally until his death in 1913 - once he died, perhaps the only ally in his life was interned in a mental hospital. Perhaps in Rodin he saw precisely his father, often absent for work: in the Buste de Rodin the master sculptor looks much more than his forty-four years, he looks like an old man with a thick beard, a severe but affectionate father figure.

Camille also had a close bond with her brother Paul, from an early age in fact their great imagination gave them a unique cohesion. Although after his law studies he embarked on a diplomatic career, he devoted himself to art through poetry and dramaturgy, after his conversion to Catholicism in 1886 he became one of the exponents of intransigent Catholicism, that Catholicism that felt public reproach in name of atavistic prejudices for nonconformist women like Camille. Camille's very religious middle-class family reacted to her crises by having her interned in a nursing home for the mentally ill in Montfavet, where she remained for thirty years until her death. According to a journalist of the time, Paul Théodore Vibert, Camille had been arbitrarily interned for persecution psychosis only because her family was ashamed of her and her unconventional behavior.
The story is quite well known today and the French have dedicated two films to it, one in 1988 with Isabelle Adjiani and Gérard Depardieu directed by bruno Nuytten, the other in 2013 with Isabelle Binoche and directed by Bruno Dumont. It was 1913 when her mother and brother Paul sent her to hospital. Camille died in an asylum in 1943, without ever creating works of art again. It is she herself who does not want to be given the materials for sculpting. Yet she still writes very lucid letters to her mother (who will never go to see her), to her brother, to some friends. From these letters Chiara Pasetti freely drew a play entitled Moi, contained in her book, which premiered in Genoa in September with the actress Lisa Galantini in the former asylum of Quarto. The book ends with photographs of many of his works and also some of Rodin's works.

BELLA KOTAK PORTRAITS

Bella Kotak is a fine art, fashion and portrait photographer. In her works the beauty and fantasy of worlds inspired by fairy tales are inhabited by strong and charismatic women and reveals to the observer the beauty and poetry of the environments, depriving them of the banality in which everyday life has placed them.
Photography changed her life when she grabbed a camera and started a Flickr project. Since then she has been drawn to this medium which translates thoughts and imagination into a tangible form.

Describe her current style as “floral”. “Flowers are always present in my work, even at the beginning when I was attracted to them without realizing it”. “Now, however, in my work everything revolves around flowers, fairytale atmospheres and spring”.
Inspired by fairy tales, nature and strong feminine characters, Bella’s images lift the veil of the past and remind us that there is magic in the most ordinary spaces. The portraits of women express Bella’s passions through photography: floral and fairy-tale subjects that become images capable of taking the observer into another dimension.
Bella has always loved reading many books and this is what fueled her imagination. She likes to create new worlds, new visions that she manages to make real through photography. Many of her photos are set outdoors because Bella loves nature and natural light very much. Shooting outdoors makes her feel much freer and more creative and allows her to capture an energy that cannot be captured if you shoot indoors with artificial light.
For Bella, both in photography and in life, it is important to approach things with a mind free from prejudice and false beliefs. For her it is necessary to recreate life as it was seen as a child, unaware of one’s limits and what was real or not. In his photos he tries to recreate a world where everything is possible and where innocence is the predominant element. Bella does not set limits to her photographic style, she still considers herself a young photographer who still has a lot to learn and for this reason she never stops lessons in new things. Only through experience will his creative eyes develop and create ever new things.
The thing that Bella loves most about photography is the ability to capture moments and create images that are able to impress the viewer. For her it is very important that her photos tell something about her and in fact she always tries to create images that are the sum of what she feels and her thoughts at that precise moment.

BODIES ART

I think the best compliment a girl can get is “you are smart”. In a world where people are pushed not to think with the brain anymore and where the most important thing is the physical aspect, finding someone who knows how to use the brain is wonderful and believe me, rare beauties like these there are few and above all few people are able to appreciate them. They are all good at opening their legs, but not all are able to use their brains.
Beauty is volatile: today you may like one thing, tomorrow you will see something else and you can fall in love with it, and so on. Beauty will get out of hand sooner or later, but your “inner being” no, it will accompany you until death, for better or for worse. Not having faith in the physical appearance because it is worse than having faith in others.
The way we dress (clothing, accessories, make-up) is an extension of our inner world. Tastes are momentary, they reflect moods. It would be appropriate to follow instinct rather than fashion, to show not only our outward appearance but also a piece of soul. It would be important not to conform to common uses. The body is the canvas, we often don’t choose it (if we want to be healthy). One thing is certain: the work we create, decorating and re-decorating ourselves, is unique and harmonious, a fusion of shapes and colors, perfect in its entirety. Deforming our body, against nature, smears the work because it reflects the inner malaise. It is not the detail that has a certain effect. It is the completeness of the body, with its movements, with its clothes, with its colors and with its shapes, to create a “figure”. We are art, and we are artists. Not everyone knows how to appreciate a high quality work; not for this we must stop being creative, not for this we must surrender to create what the applicant wants. A high quality work is a work made with the soul, which ignores the tastes of the beholder. What we decide to show engages with the momentary tastes of the viewer: he who abandons himself to wanting to interpret what he sees coherently with his world, synchronizes with our soul. Here is the spark, the love at first sight between artist and observer. Those who dwell on the details and look for them as if we were a shopping list, have no artistic spirit, have succumbed to the induction of advertising needs. Let’s remember the importance of art, and the beauty of being artists.
Love is not falling in love with a nice butt or a perfect body. Love is not going around and bragging about having a ‘perfect girlfriend’ or a ‘sexy boyfriend. Love is not stopping at appearances. Love is going beyond: love is digging deep to find the soul, looking beyond what we are on the outside, not stopping at the size of the bra, or jeans. Love is finding what is inside our body, which is only the shell of our essence.
All my life I have been surrounded by people who were wrong, embarrassed, hurt others, were unfair, and were always forgiven, while I have always been silent and those few times that I dared to say something wrong I was condemned . From here I started thinking about all the privileges that being beautiful, being thin brings, because in my life it has always been like this. Beauty gives the opportunity to be yourself, not to be rejected, to be appreciated. I almost killed myself because I wanted so much to be like them, to finally be able to speak, to open up, to be loved. I just wanted to be beautiful. It may seem superficial, but to me it wasn’t, and it’s not. Try to live your whole life surrounded by people who use you, who never want to see you for who you are beyond appearances, to be surrounded by people who behave horribly but who are forgiven for a simple reason. It is too difficult to believe that the world is not like this. And it’s unfair, it’s unfair to know that you have so much to give and can’t do it, it’s unfair to be rejected so many times that you end up thinking you don’t deserve anything. The world is unfair, and the saddest thing is that I feel I can’t do anything about it.
The ‘physical’ factor is perhaps one of the first criteria of perfection that they impose on us right from the start. Wherever you look, you find yourself small and frail little bodies as an emblem of beauty and superiority. But how did we get to this superficial homologation where everything that is not perfectly linear is ugly? Until a few years ago, perfect beauty was identified through the curves of a body. The more you were abundant, the more you liked it. Now if you can’t wear skinny jeans you don’t even get considered, as if you weren’t a real person. Without feelings, as if the offenses did not affect you in the least. As if you don’t have to fight this odyssey enough on your own. All this superficiality that people inculcate in your mind does not go away and stays with you. And you carry it inside, and you have to live with that sense of bitterness and rejection.

EXTREME MAKE UP

In an era in which Kate Middleton, Duchess of Cambridge and wife of the heir to the throne of England, nonchalantly flaunts the same dress on several occasions, clearing the practice of recycling against which fashion addicted have pointed the finger for many years, It is no surprise that more and more companies are emerging on the Web that make second-hand clothes and accessories their specialty. Yet, the idea that Karen Horiuchi had when she founded Glambot.com is definitely new: instead of t-shirts, tops, skirts and dresses, the company has focused on make-up, selling eyeshadows, foundations at discounted prices. and even used and “refurbished” make-up brushes.
She’s good, wear makeup as well. A little mascara and a trickle of pencil. Put a brush of powder on it too and be careful not to forget your dear friend blush. Put whatever you want in it, and then get out. Have fun, drink, laugh, joke, scream, don’t care, live! But then you will have to go home and take off that mask that you created yourself adapting it to your face. You didn’t think about this huh? You can’t wear it forever, it’s a mask destined to be taken off, sooner or later. It is one of those masks that make you look beautiful at first; but then its beauty gradually fades away and all that remains is your true beauty; the one you have never noticed, because it lies in simplicity, in small gestures, in the most hidden details. That true beauty that you have never shown anyone; the one that no one knows; the one no one knows exists. Maybe because you don’t want anyone to see it, or maybe you think that, once it is revealed, nobody would appreciate it. And the funniest thing of all is that others do the same thing to you, without your knowledge. Because this is now a world of masks in which the actors who wear them are none other than the protagonists of this film called “Life”, where appearing is more important than being; where the story of being beautiful inside, nobody cares. Where nobody ever thinks that perhaps it would be better to be hated for who they really are, than loved for that fucking mask that we insist on wearing to please others.
Why do you stay in front of the mirror for hours before you go out? There is always someone more beautiful than you. Why do you look at the clock every five seconds? So much gives you the hole. Why do not you eat? You suck even with ten kilos less. Why are you wearing makeup? No one ever looks at your eyes anyway. Why are you hoping for it? Nothing good ever happens to you anyway.
All women need makeup. Don’t let anyone tell you a different thing. The only woman who was pretty enough to go without makeup was Elizabeth Taylor and she wore tons of it. “A few days ago I came across this phrase written as a caption under a photo shared on instagram by a fashion blogger, I felt offended and I I’m angry. The girl defines herself as a “fashion influencer” and this made me reflect, because actually she is a girl who is very active on social media and has a following of about 33,000 people, mostly girls who could potentially take her as a model and follow what he says, being influenced. I wondered how it is possible to write such a thing, to get the message across that everyone needs to wear makeup, to get the message across that they are not “enough”. how to make this girl reflect on the fact that it is not a good message at all. A friend of mine commented, in a very calm and open way to dialogue. , in response, the girl deleted the comment, changed the caption (without much improvement, however) and blocked my friend. I think that all these girls who have all this following could have great opportunities to pass important messages, to influence in a positive and constructive way instead they get lost in these frivolities, they remain on the verge of superficiality … Probably because that’s what “sells” “, this is what” earns “. The baseness that is raised and acclaimed pisses me off.
Many think about the type of girl they would like: tall, short, brunette, blonde, eec… but I think about when. I would like to meet her in the morning, still sleepy because the night before she studied a little too much, without makeup and with the overalls, because having gone to sleep late she obviously woke up late and left the house in a hurry. If on that occasion I find her beautiful I do not dare to imagine how she will be once dressed well and made up. So dear girls, don’t wear too much make-up like clowns because simple you are beautiful …

FREE TO BE DRAG

LE PETITE NOIRE winner of the 2015 edition of Drag Factor Italia, drag of the Love Giam evening and protagonist of the NYX Face Awards. She is a beauty queen of the capital, known in particular for her original and glamorous looks.
The term Drag Queen refers to all those men, usually singers or actors, who perform in public wearing women’s clothes, make-up and wigs. It is usually thought that most men who make this kind of choice are gay, but in reality, this is not the case at all: many Drag Queens, in fact, are married and have families and, simply, find it fun to step into the shoes of a woman. woman for the purpose of a singing show or a play.
Transsexuals who have undergone a sex change and transvestites are excluded from the Drag Queen category; the former are excluded because they are not men in all respects while, the latter, because they dress up as women every day and not only sporadically. The fact that not all men who dress up are Drag Queens is one to keep in mind as it marks the stark difference between Trans and Drag. Women who love to dress up as men are also Drag but, instead of being called Queen, they are called Drag King.
However, there is a huge difference between drag queens and cross-dressers: that of drag queens is in fact an art, not exclusively the preserve of homosexual men, nor of men.
The drag king phenomenon was born, almost parallel to that of drag queens, at the end of the 19th century, and the most famous drag king woman was undoubtedly Vesta Tilley, considered a true forerunner of the genre. To succeed in the “enterprise”, for example, drag kings resort to bending, or bandages to flatten the breasts, to contouring to emphasize some facial features, or to packing, which precisely confers the “package”.

KIMONO TIME

Japan has always fascinated me. A vision of the world so far removed from that of the West, the contrast between discreet and refined voices and feelings, against rigor and absolute respect for honor. The figure of the Geisha and the world of the Samurai.
How is the kimono made? Women’s dresses are made up of at least 15 parts, each with a name that describes it (outer, inner, over and under collar lining, sleeve hole and drape, etc.). The dressing starts from the first layer, in contact with the skin (in the demonstration the models remained dressed), to continue with different layers as the quality and uniqueness of the kimono increases. In the demonstration, the girls were swaddled with meters and meters of fabric, every time they wore a layer I thought it was the last, but the dressing still continued. Even the middle layers (linings and petticoats) are of fine fabric, with refined decorations and colors.
The kimono is the traditional Japanese dress, both for men and women. There are long lists of names that define different types of kimonos, more or less valuable, according to the use and the category of people who wore them: formal for married women, business dress, with a decorated motif (which gives the name to the type of dress), or in common fabric to go to the spa, to practice martial arts or the art of entertainment of the Geisha.
Although the kimono is a distinctly Japanese form of clothing, its roots are said to be from China. The earliest form of kimono was worn as a type of underwear, gaining popularity in Japan during the Muromachi period (1392-1573), when they began to be worn without hakama (traditional Japanese pants) and paired with a shaft called an obi. Since the Edo period (1603-1867) the kimono as we know it today has truly become part of Japanese costumes, with an ever-increasing variety of colors, fabrics and styles available. The obi has become wider and the length of the sleeves has grown. The kimono is worn by women or girls and by men

There are several elements involved when wearing a kimono. To understand a kimono, it is important to know the pieces that make it up, here are some of the main parts that make up a kimono:
Kimono – is the main garment, which can be made from a variety of materials including, cotton, linen, wool and silk.

Obi – the outermost belt tied to a kimono. The knot can be tied in a variety of decorative ways.

Juban – A type of underwear specifically used with kimonos.

Koshi-himo – the belt tied around the waist to secure the kimono in place.

Datejime – A belt attached to the kimono, but under the obi, which helps obi maintain shape.

Tabi – Socks specially designed to be worn with traditional Japanese footwear.
The foot area is divided into two sections.

Geta, Zori – These are some of the traditional types of footwear worn with kimonos. They look a bit like modern sandals.
Types of Kimono

Furisode – This is the type of kimono worn by young unmarried women and girls. It is distinguishable by the long sleeves and in bright colors. Furisode is the typical kimono worn during the Japan Age Day (‘Seijin no Hi’).

Tomesode – A formal kimono that is worn by women who are married. It can be decorated in intricate crests and patterns, however these decorations are typically found below the waist. Mothers traditionally wear a black tomesode at their child’s wedding. There are also colorful tomesodes, which are sometimes worn by single women on special occasions. ·

Houmongi – literally meaning “to dress kimono”, a houmongi is a type of kimono suitable for any age and marital status. You can identify this kimono with the patterns that run over the shoulders and bottom. This type of kimono can be worn to attend wedding or tea ceremonies.

Yukata – the type of kimono most often seen in Japanese summer festivals. Yukata are made of thin material and suitable for both women and men. However, men’s yukatas are not as colorful as those worn by women.

Komon – Another type of casual kimono. A comone is usually decorated in a repeating pattern. The comone is perfect, everyday casual, as it was the common everyday dress in the days before western clothing became standard wear.

Iromuji – A solid color kimono worn by married and unmarried women. Iromuji can be in any color with the exception of white or black, however, they are in rather muted tones. They can also be decorated with crests – the more crests there are, the more formal the kimono is. This is a simple yet sophisticated kimono.
Over the course of history the kimono has had more or less fortunate periods, remaining, however, a latent reference in patient waiting for a gust of wind or style to bring it back on the catwalks and in our wardrobes. From Poiret to Yamamoto, from Galliano to Saint Laurent, from Thom Browne to J.W. Anderson, no designer has been able to ignore its charm by proposing it, each in its own way, even in recent seasons. Despite being very current and loved by stars like Florence Welch and Beyoncé, who, still pregnant with twins, wore a Gucci one to a basketball game, this pivotal piece of Japanese costume has a very ancient history.

GUOI PEI- THE LEGEND OF DRAGON

The Chinese artist continues to walk her own path, designing dresses that incorporate the magic of Chinese mythology, the splendor of the Qing Empire, and the traditions of Chinese painters, embroiderers, and artisans. Guo Pei infuses every creation with an artistic passion. She aims to seamlessly blend Chinese tradition with western modernity. Guo Pei draws inspiration from fairy tales and legends, and most surprisingly, military history. I love this asiatic fashion.

Guo Pei, Couture, autumn-winter 2019, Paris, France

VISIT ITALY: VENICE BIENNALE

Venice Biennale is an international art exhibition featuring architecture, visual arts, cinema, dance, music, and theatre that is held in the Castello district of Venice every two years during the summer.

BIENNALE 2017
BIENNALE 2017
BIENNALE 2017
The Biennale was founded in 1895 as the International Exhibition of Art of the City of Venice to promote “the most noble activities of the modern spirit without distinction of country.” The first Biennale, which achieved worldwide recognition and welcomed more than 200,000 visitors, included artists from 16 countries.
BIENNALE 2019
BIENNALE 2019
BIENNALE 2019
BIENNALE 2019
For more than 100 years the Biennale concentrated on showcasing four areas—art, theatre, music, and cinema—but in 1998 it expanded to include architecture and dance. In 2004 the festival’s sponsoring organization was restructured as a foundation in order to increase the efficiency of programming and to attract investment from private partners. At the beginning of the 21st century it typically attracted more than 300,000 visitors.
BIENNALE 2018
BIENNALE 2018
BIENNALE 2018
PREVIEW BIENNALE 2021

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