TAKE CARE OF THE SPIRITUAL BODY

Tattooed, named, made up, trained, trained, cured and kuratiert, artfully chiseled and medicated to the bitter end, the body is the great protagonist of the singularist turning point: the phenomenon appears evident if we connect it to another important turning point of our times, that secularist. We have one body, we only have one body, the life of our body is the only life we ​​have and that life is our only individual possibility. We can certainly transmit the life of the species by reproducing, following the biological drive, the collective life, the life of the species. We can even prove ourselves so open and unselfish that we are committed today not only to the life of our direct descendants or our compatriots but also to that of people far away in space, and even that of people distant in time, future generations. We could imagine leaving them a healthy, fair and clean world, following the intuition that belonged to Hans Jonas and which has recently been taken up and elaborated by some currents of ecological thought, sustainability and the ethics of care. All this sounds very beautiful and selfless, but in the end this body of ours is the only one we have, hic et nunc, and every man is unique. The fact is that the process of secularization has also led those who believe in religions that promise eternal life in the hereafter, to cling to the fleeting life afterwards. Secularism, in the brilliant reconstruction of Charles Taylor, a believing Catholic philosopher, means the exit of religion from the public sphere as well as the distancing of people from God and the Church and the decline of religious practices. It is a phenomenon that historically began in the Western world around the sixteenth century and developed in some countries more than in others, and by virtue of which faith in God, from an axiom that was within a context in which not believing was virtually impossible. , has become an alternative, a human possibility among many. Modern society has become secular just as it has become democratic and mediatized and singularized, and this is a simple fact, and the majority of its members are in fact secular (whether they are faithful to a religion, skeptics, agnostics, doubters, atheists convinced). The eternal life of the soul in eternal bliss has become a smoky and unconvincing expectation, just as few devote themselves to caring for the soul to guarantee its immortality. The contemporary commitment, even of many believers, more than aiming at the immortality of the soul, focuses on caring for the body, to be kept alive and protected from aging and disease through technical interventions of various kinds and of different scope. We are faced with a ghost of immortality that is not based on the predominance of religions but on the myth of man perfected by science and technology. The care of the soul, managed by the churches and their systems and trained by spiritual exercises, has given way to the care of the body and brain trained by physical and mental exercises.

THE EFFEC OF ART IN THE BRAIN

There are artists who paint what they see, others who paint what they remember or what they imagine. Our brain changes in the face of reality but, at the same time, it is capable of changing it: a "different" brain must therefore have a different relationship with reality.
In art this "process" can lead to the creation of new realities, which will only partly depend on "sensorial information"; our brain, in fact, does not necessarily need the continuous "information flow" coming from our senses. Dreams, memories that "revive" in mental images and also representations "simply" created by our mind testify to this event.
In this sense, art amplifies reality, creates a new "mental channel" capable of opening up to new experiences. The visual stimuli, real or evoked by memory, which excite the nervous system of the artist at the moment of the creation of the work of art, transformed by his hand into colors and shapes, will stimulate the nervous system of the observer. The work of art must be able to arouse in the observer's brain sensations and emotions that were present in the artist's brain. Approaching a work of art, looking at it, perceiving it, understanding it and appreciating it, implies the involvement of many brain structures and the activation of very specific mechanisms, starting from the functioning at the basis of visual perception, to those involved in the so-called "psychology of see ", in the aesthetic and emotional experience. This refers not only to the emotion felt by those who enjoy a painting but also to the creative moment that involves the artist to create his work.
Some researchers, especially psychologists and neurophysiologists, have been fascinated by the possibility of studying the properties and characteristics of the brain that are part of the evaluation of a work of art and the pleasure it can give; persuaded by the idea that the understanding of these cerebral mechanisms, together with the knowledge of the events of the life of an artist and of the culture of his time, can favor a greater "knowledge" and appreciation of the work and of those who created it.
A work of art is born from the combination of what the artist experiences "visually" and how he interprets what is communicated to him from the outside world. Both the acquisition of visual information and its internal processing can be altered by pathological causes.
The effects of serious mental illnesses, often altering the artist's perceptive and emotional abilities, can affect his pictorial expression and testify how the painter's life story becomes an integral part of his work.
All this emerges in the paintings of some great painters in particular moments of their life.

MANUAL SKILLS

The manual world of practical skills is valued more than the mental world. Manual skills are appreciated by all. While mental abilities are underestimated and considered useless. Many of you who work with PCs or do mind-active jobs will know that many consider these jobs to be “comfortable” and almost trivial. On the other hand, practical professions are considered more essential and are valued more (and also with greater earnings. Mental professions such as writing a film or entering data or building graphics or preparing a lesson or discovering a new star are considered non-essential. the plumber, the electrician, the bricklayer, the mechanic … are considered essential and very important. Even those who have knowledge in these fields are valued more than those who make artistic or computer professions. It is no coincidence that there are even derogatory nicknames about these mental professions as: artist and nerd and mad scientist. While for the practical professions there is no derogatory. So in this society even if a good 70% of the population does mental work (since technology has also replaced many practical actions) the remaining 30% is considered more important.

CHILDREN PSYCHOLOGICAL ABUSE

Children who are emotionally abused and neglected face similar and sometimes worse mental health problems as children who are physically or sexually abused, yet psychological abuse is rarely addressed in prevention programs or in treating victims, according to a new study published by the American Psychological Association.
“Given the prevalence of childhood psychological abuse and the severity of harm to young victims, it should be at the forefront of mental health and social service training,” said study lead author Joseph Spinazzola, PhD, of The Trauma Center at Justice Resource Institute, Brookline, Massachusetts. The article will appear in a special issue of the APA journal Psychological Trauma: Theory, Research, Practice, and Policy®

https://www.apa.org/news/press/releases/2014/10/psychological-abuse

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